Archive for the “Marmaris” Category


Merhaba,

  Wednesday’s weather isn’t cooperating, but Thursday and Friday will be just fine so we’re postponing our departure one day.  While we travel I’ll be at the mercy of many different wifi sources.  I’ll try to keep everyone up to date, but I think mostly it will be just through or website www.mydoramac.com.  I send out email to all of you through my Outlook Express on my computer which I took with us during our recent land travels in Turkey.  I didn’t have to lug it around, the bus carried it.  But in our travels around the Mediterranean,  I’m not sure how often I’ll have my computer with me when we have access to wifi.  When I use web Yahoo at Internet Cafes there is a problem sending out to so many people at one time.  Yahoo thinks it’s spam and there’s always a problem.  So when I have to rely on other computers, I’ll only send to Audrey to post on our website www.mydoramac.com.  When I have my computer I’ll send to everyone but remind you to check for ones you didn’t receive from me directly.  It’s been a while since we’ve had to deal with this issue and maybe it won’t even be a problem. 

  So anyway…guess that’s it.

Ru

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  This is probably the final time I’ll type that address; at least for 2013.  Yesterday morning we “sea tested” DoraMac and everything was mostly fine.  Our ICOM radio may, or may not send sailmail, but that’s a convenience issue and not a seaworthy issue.  I need regular wifi to send blog posts.  As we’ll be moving quite a bit, my posts might be much less often.  Then you’ll get a billion at once with a zillion photos to clog your mailbox.  I’ll really try not to do that. 

  Our plan is to attend one final Tuesday Happy Hour to say our good-byes and then Wednesday morning leave the marina about 8:00 am to be at the check-out dock at customs by 8:30.  (Customs is just around the other side of the marina but I like leaving lots of time.)   If all goes quickly at check-out  we’ll leave for Simi (Symi) Greece and arrive by mid-afternoon for our check-in process.  It will start our Schengen clock ticking which is only a sort of daunting thought.  We have 90 days to be through the Med and on our way to the Channel Islands.  Tunisia isn’t part of Schengen so our visit there will stop the clock for a bit. 

  So here are some final photos of lovely Marmaris, Turkey.  It has been a great place to winter thanks to all of Gwen’s hard work to make marina living more fun; the great people we’ve met here; and the  friendly, helpful  marina staff.  All in all, a hard place to leave.

Ru

DoraMac

One last stroll through Old Town Marmaris 2013

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A new Subway opened along the waterfront…

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A sign you’ll never see in the Roanoke Subway…..

  “6 inch Sub & Beer for 15.90 TL”  =  about $ 9. 

Interesting too is that the sub size is given in inches and not centimeters as everything else here is in metric.  Randal and I stick to our Turkish favorites; we can eat Subway at home.

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Town end of Bar Street; quiet and peaceful until about 11 PM and then the boom booms make our boat shake.

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When we were first new, the blue Beach sign was the landmark to turn back towards the marina.

 

Old Mosque Square….

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Fountain for washing of hands and feet.

The mosque is opposite but now has its own faucets.  Across from the fountain is MGM which is sort of like TJ Maxx.

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Lou from C’mon Girl and I braved the curious onlookers and came here to sketch on morning.   We actually sat across from this scene and I drew it, including a very patient man who sat the whole time I sketched.  Maybe he was resting or maybe he was sitting for me.  The next day I walked past and the benches had all been painted preventing anyone from sitting anywhere for a few days.

 

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The day I was taking these photos, this store owner asked about my friend and me and our “art work.” 

She remembered me and asked which was nice.  My sketch wasn’t good enough to give her, or I would have.  Lou and her husband Guy returned to Canada for Lou’s daughter’s wedding and another daughter’s graduation from nursing school.  Lou makes beautiful art quilts among her other art projects.

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I love alleys.

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This fire engine had only inches to spare getting down this pedestrian street. Good thing the truck wasn’t there for a fire.

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Path to the Castle

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I walked past this small shop which is hard to do as the “grandmother” takes your hand and talks non-stop asking where you’re from and don’t you want to see her shop.  I bought one of the small prints in the right hand corner. 

Unfortunately this was the morning I discovered the Castle would not reopen until July.  One time, our first visit to Marmaris, Randal and I walked to the Castle but it was closed for lunch.  The next time we visited, our second visit to Turkey, it was closed for renovation. 

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Cats….

The paths up the hillside are just lovely with stone and pink flowering shrubs and cats.

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This is the land of Turkish towels and olive oil soap.

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How to wear a scarf….Great Display though I don’t think I could replicate most of them.

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Turkish Delight sweets…

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Hidden cats…

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Another scene needing a script or just a guy taking a break in the shade.

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Merhaba,

   It’s Memorial Day Weekend in the US. We just celebrated ANZAC day here where both Turkish and Australian soldiers lost their lives.  Many of the enemies of the first two world wars are now allies.  Interesting to think about especially here in Turkey which is a prime example. 

   But on a lighter note….

Ru

Marmaris at night with Deena and TK

Our friends Deena and TK treated us to a farewell dinner at Fellini’s last week.  It also gave me a chance to take some final night time photos of the waterfront

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Sitting upstairs overlooking all of the Turkish Gullets here for the summer charter season.

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Strolling back past the carpet shops…….

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And the restaurants all lit up for the evening.

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This sign points to the castle on the hill. 

The signs and the castle walls are the only part of the castle we’ll ever see as the museum renovations won’t be completed until after we’ve left. 

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The waterfront fountain in blue lights

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Green lights                                                                        Red lights

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Randal called it a night but Deena, TK and I stopped at the Sweet Shop  so I could treat us to dessert.  They had a concoction called warm cake and I had a mug of Salep, my now favorite dessert.  (Warm cake is chocolate cake with warm, fudgy chocolate in the center. 

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Merhaba,

   Today Randal biked over to the Post Office and there was the book he’d ordered from England.  So now nothing is holding us in Marmaris.  We will take the boat for a test spin on Sunday and then check out either Monday or Tuesday and be on our way.  At least that’s the plan today. 

   When we first came to Marmaris there was nothing in the way of “art” that I could find.  Now we have the Culture and Art Center with its variety of exhibits and cute little coffee shop.  Today we discovered another art venue.  Here’s the story.

Ru

Yellow Building I always loved… 

Tozak Merkez (Center)

Mustafa Muğlalı Cad. No:15

Muğla / Marmaris / (Türkiye

    Ever since we’ve been in Marmaris; the few months in 2011 and this year; I’ve loved this particular yellow building.  How could you not love a bright yellow building with black wrought iron details?   While it was becoming the gallery it now seems to be, I once tried to invade, but with no luck.  The artist who renovated the space and who works, paints, and perhaps lives here speaks very little English.  This week, on my way home from the Thursday market I noticed that the gallery was now officially opened; but as I had my hands full of fruit and vegetables, it wasn’t such a good time to visit.  Today Trish and I did visit the gallery and I took lots of photos of the beautiful displays and lovely building.  You can see more of the building and the artist’ work on her website listed below.

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http://moda-oya.com/indexen.asp  artist’s website

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2013 Fair and Exhibition Activities

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Trish and the artist Oya Ṣener

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Artist at work                                                                          An embroidered self-portrait?

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Beautiful space

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Painted scarves  and embroidery                                                                    Beautiful embroidered pillows

 

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Portrait of Atatὒrk                                                                   Family photos?  These women’s stories?

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Upstairs space.   There was another flight of stairs that I was really wanting to climb, but we were only invited to go up one flight…not to invade her home.

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Trish admiring the intricate work. 

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I was attracted by the colors

We each bought some small prints.  I also bought a card that was a photo of 1976 Bar Street before it was Bar Street.  Netsel Marina opened in 1989 bringing with it many changes to the harbor area and town of Marmaris.  Interestingly, according to today’s news, the Turkish Parliament just passed a bill banning the sale of alcohol between 10 PM and 6 AM.  If that’s true it might make Bar Street far less noisy and end the drum beat that goes until 4 AM.  That would be good for us, but sad for the tourist trade.

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Merhaba,

  We’re still here, but we do have a tentative plan.  It’s attached as an Excel file.  I’ve started to research Sicily and Sardinia as we’re pretty positive about those places.  Our friends Ed and Sue are in Tunisia now and really liking it.  We’ll stop there for sure too. 

  Randal has most of the boat ready to go.  And today I had my first “drive the dinghy” lesson.  I can do it if I have too; and certainly I can row it if I had to. 

  The Mediterranean weather isn’t being so cooperative this week, but should be fine when we actually do decide to head out.  Lots of folks already ahead of us.  They just stay put while the wind blows. 

  I haven’t been taking any new photos.  I have been painting a bit.  I’m trying to paint a postcard size picture of Marmaris harbor and so far, not so good.  But I’ll keep trying.

   Several local folks, when they realize I am an American, tell me how sorry they are about the devastation in Oklahoma.  We have found the Turkish people to be very kind and caring people.  Other countries will have a hard act to follow. 

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Ru

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Merhaba,

   Yesterday morning I walked to the Arts and Culture Center.    An exhibit of model ships was in the process of being installed.  Randal was excited about seeing it (and needed a break from his boat chores) so this morning Randal, our friend Collin and I went off to see it. Before we left our boat Randal asked if I had my camera and I said yes.   I’d taken it out and put it down on the chart table to put it in my pack.    But somehow I managed to leave the camera on the chart table.  Luckily Collin had his camera and loaned it to me to take some photos.  I didn’t do justice to either his camera, or the exhibit.  But at least there are some photos to share with you.    And because “no good deed goes unpunished,”  Collin had to hunt up his camera cable because his camera card wouldn’t fit in my computer.  He first had to find the cable and then he kindly transferred the photos from his camera card to a stick for me.  Thanks Collin!

  Because the exhibition was model ships and we have a marina full of cruisers, I announced the exhibit on the morning NET.  While we were there several other cruisers stopped in to see the exhibit as well. 

Ru

Model Ship Exhibit at the Culture and Art Center

http://www.gemimodelcileridernegi.org/

is the website of the organization whose members built the models on display in Marmaris. 

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Model Ship Association exhibit poster

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http://www.gemimodelcileridernegi.org/

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Collin

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Collin patiently posing for me.

I think it helps to have someone in the photo so you get an idea of the size of the model

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Randal and Collin conferring

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Future sailors or boat builders?

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Future sailors or boat builders?

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A model of Pearl Harbor

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Model Boat Builders with Randal and Collin

I’m not sure if the women are boat builders or Center Staff, but the men insisted they be included so they are important to the exhibit.  The group had come from Istanbul; I believe we were told the exhibit is traveling around Turkey. 

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They also insisted on a second photo with me included this time.

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Model of a ship being built.

The calendar by the door has a portrait of the Titanic Captain!  The figure in the blue shirt by the boat plans is carrying a pail.  We watched for at least a minute as the pail swung back and forth.  Nothing else moved.  That fascinated Randal as we weren’t sure why it was happening.  I did accidentally kick one of the table legs and that made the pail swing faster but nothing else moved…so it’s a mystery.

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Plans for the “boat under construction.”

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Blue Nose

http://www.tourcanada.com/bluenose.htm  tells the story of this racing fishing vessel and the International Fishermen’s Race.  Below is the introductory paragraph.

    “In the early part of the 20th century, the fishing fleets in the Maritime provinces and the New England states operated under sail. The Banks were the favored fishing grounds of both Canadian and American fishermen. Their vessels were strongly constructed to weather the rigorous challenges of the North Atlantic fishing grounds but were also built for speed and holding capacity. During this era, a popular topic of discussion in the few free time hours that these fishermen had was the America’s Cup races. These had started in 1851 and were a test of seamanship between the best British and United States racing schooners. In 1919, after years of domination by the Americans, a race was cancelled because of 25 knot winds and this created much distain among the rugged Banks fishermen. They suggested that the racing schooners had become too fragile and a better test of seamanship would be a competition involving the sailing ships and men who fished the Grand Banks.”

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Such minute detail on each of the models.

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Those huge oars remind me of my Outward Bound days at Hurricane Island.

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In the hallway of the center was a small replica that kids could climb on.  This is such a cool place!

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Merhaba,

  I want to share these scrip options as possible story lines for the women with the red hair.

Ru

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From Ken

Oh yes, there is a movie here: after the third scene, the train begins to pull away and the camera then rises above the train, watching it roll off into the countryside, then returning to the couple still gazing into each other’s eyes. They have never met, can’t even speak each other’s language, yet they both know that their futures are to be intertwined. 

From Roy

Not original, but maybe in frame 3   "we’ll always have Paris" .  In background someone is already rounding up the "usual suspects".
  So sorry (not really) but I couldn’t help myself  !     Roy   … Note ;  nowhere did I  even whisper "play it again Sam"

From Gwen

I love this!  I have a script: Her name is  Alara.  It means, literally,"red ornament".  But she was a natural brunette, but never felt natural or possessed any sense of wellbeing; almost as if she was out of sync with herself. Alara  went to the hairdresser and asked to be a red head.  The hairdresser thought Alara meant like auburn, or strawberry blonde.  But the hairdresser didn’t question Alara and the hair dresser stripped all the colour from Alara’s hair.. then, several hours later, after the hairdresser had , created strawberry blonde, Alara took one look in the mirror and was horrified.  She was not RED.  After some mixing and chemistry by the hairdresser, Alara was finally RED.  She loved it. But she knew her husband was going to have a temper tantrum because his girlfriend also had hair this RED!  Alara walked outside the hairdresser, toward the small Migros in Netsel marina.  She didn’t know what to do, so she just stood by a boat nearby and pondered some kind of solution.  She’d already spent about 8 hours in the hair salon and close 350 Turkish Lira on her husband’s credit card… then it started to rain.  As it rained, Alara noticed some of the wet drops from her hair fell on her blouse.  The drops were light red!  After about 30 minutes, her blue blouse was slightly turning a dark purple!  It was then that her husband, who worked on boats, wandered by and saw her.  he stopped… dead in his tracks. " OMG"" he exclaimed (he was a chat room expert  and avidly into twittering).  "love it" he cried.  Then added in a tender and caring voice, "and I love you, my dear RED Alara!"     They did not, however, live happily ever after because the RED colour was not permanent.  Just a RED vegetable dye … leaving  Alara’s hair, after a week or so, just a drab orange…

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Merhaba

   We’re still here.  Randal is off on his umpteenth trip to chandlery street.  Most big stuff is done, but he still has a list.  We’re also still finalizing our tentative route to England.  I’m almost certain we’ll stop in Sicily, Sardinia, Tunisia, and visit Gibraltar.  In Gibraltar we’re so close to Casablanca that I think we should visit.   Casablanca is Randal’s favorite movie.  I think we must know half the dialogue by heart, we’ve watched it so many times.   But all will be determined by weather and timing so we’ll see.  I’m actually, finally ready to go; summer season in Marmaris with the crowds and NOISE from Bar Street every night make the leave-taking easier.  Saying good-bye to friends, not looking forward to that.  But permanence isn’t part of the cruising world.  Some stops may be longer than others, but eventually most everyone moves on.  Maybe that’s what the story in these photos is about….

Ru

Seen from a window, a scene screaming for a script.

Our pilot house door has a window; a very dirty window.  Typing this prompted me to go clean it.  However, prior to it being cleaned, the streaks made for a very “artsy” image of a woman standing on the dock.  I’d taken the photos to capture her very orange hair; not to make fun.  I applaud women who have fun with their hair.  The image that showed up was not what I expected.  It’s not a photo of a woman with red hair; it’s a story about a woman with red hair. 

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Merhaba,

   The final story from our Black Sea visit.  I’m ready to go back.  So much more to see, and do and eat!

Ru

    Our final day was a long day.  We started the morning in Safranbolu with a 9 am cave hike (I started with a 6 am walk around modern Safranbolu) and ended with a final dinner in Ankara where we thanked our intrepid mini-bus driver Ayden and our patient, kind-hearted guide Taṣ.  There was even cake with sparkly candles. 

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Gwen thanking Ayden and Taṣ; Patience and Fortitude… Gary looking on.

Actually Patience and Fortitude are the marble male African lions outside the New York Public Library.

“What these radiate is calm and strength, majesty, tranquility, all really good things to be sending as signals at a library.” http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/21/in-honor-of-a-century-of-patience-and-fortitude/   Pretty good description of what it takes to lead a group of independent cruisers anywhere.

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Ayden was more than the bus driver.  He made everything more fun with his interest and attentiveness.

He never said no and always had a smile.  

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I hadn’t noticed Taṣ’ gray hair the first day of the trip; but this photo taken in Yὄrὒk Kὄyὒ shows a sprinkle of them.   He internalized his stress and kept a smile on his face.  Here he is tasting a raw almond, or something, because none of us would and someone had to. 

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Mark, Dorothy, Patricia and Dave listening to Gwen’s speech.

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Strawberries, kiwis, and cake: Oh My!  Celebrating the end of a very fun journey.

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A Turkish students from Izmir, (I think he said Izmir and not Istanbul) wanted his photo taken with us. 

You can see that cruisers are definitely not “teetotalers. 

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Our blue caps that Ayden was going to deliver to a collection point.

During the trip I was the “keeper of the caps” and people were always handing them to me so I had them in every pocket of my backpack during each day. Each night I would fish them all out to put in a plastic bag for safekeeping.

One final story.

I don’t have a photo of Tazeena’s ceramic pots.  (Had I known how the story was going to play out I would surely have taken one.)    Tazeena really wanted some ceramic pots.  So after passing up one chance to buy some, finally did at a gift shop next to our lunch stop outside Yὄrὒk Kὄyὒ.  While we all had been eating, Tazeena, with Taṣ’ help, had negotiated for two!  But how to get them home on the plane? These were not “fit in your hand pots, but you need two hands to hold them pots.  One went into David’s suitcase packed with dirty laundry.  The other went into Tazeena’s backpack.  David’s luggage went through the checked-baggage scanner, no problem.  But Tazeena’s backpack set off the alarm.  Problem is the checkers believed the alarm was set off by the pack following Tazeena’s which was Patricia’s.  So while Tazeena was walking merrily on her way, Patricia was having to totally unpack her backpack protesting the entire time that there was no pot in her pack.  And, indeed, there was no pot in her pack and the guards made no effort to find the real pack with the pot.

The flight was smooth and shorter than our 2 hour drive back from Bodrum Airport to Marmaris.  But it was sunny and nice and while everyone was happy to be home, I think we were all sorry to have left the Black Sea. 

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Merhaba,

  Yesterday our new dinghy and recertified life raft were delivered.  So we’re pretty close to being ready to set off within the next few weeks.  I’m also just about finished with the emails of our Black Sea trip.  This final one about Safranbolu and one about our last evening in Ankara; and finis!  Then I can begin araṣtirmak (to research) the places we’re tentatively planning to visit on our way to London.  

   Looking back on the 3 Safranbolu emails it’s hard to believe that we did so much before 2 pm! 

Ru

Safranbolu Part 3 :  Walk around the arasta.

We all started out following Taṣ though the narrow streets of shops, but it’s hard to souvenir shop as a group.  And as it was about noon, Randal wanted food more than he wanted stuff, so we went off on our own to a small “not tourist” restaurant to share some lentil soup and grilled chicken.  We were to regroup at 2 pm.

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More blue caps.  If I didn’t already say, we drank enough water during over our 7 days to collect almost 90 caps.

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Randal loves these light weight construction blocks.  We have a North Cyprus photo just like this.

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The date on the sign says 1661!

We were doing our group thing at this point, so as we passed I took photos of the traditional coffee making, but didn’t stop to sample any. 

Lonely Planet review for Arasta Lonca Kahvesi

This is one of the town’s most congenial places for a coffee, but it’s in the thick of the arasta action, so you pay for the atmosphere (çay TL2.50); head to the backstreets for a quieter, cheaper cuppa.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/

  (I have paid both less and more for Çay (tea) other places.)

Arasta: Row of shops near a mosque, the rent from which supports the mosque.

Lonca: Dictionary definition is “guild.”

Kahvesi: Kahve is coffee and the si makes it a possessive. 

So maybe Coffee of the Arasta Guild

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Traditional coffee making; but the woman is in very western dress with no head scarf.

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I’m not leaving Turkey without one of these long handled “coffee makers.”

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I think these small Ottoman house models were becoming lamps

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Pinocchio is alive and well in Turkey; we see puppets everywhere.

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Randal times 2.

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Soon the vines will be leaf covered and providing shade.

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The Izzet Mehmet Pasha Mosque (I think)

Built in 1796 by Izzet Mehmet Pasha  entirely of cut stone.

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Kazdaḡli Mosque 1778

It was built by Kazdagli Mehmet Aga in 1779. The mosque was constructed from stone and brick. Its brick minaret has one balcony (serefe). The mosque, which was sold to private person in 1930’s, was donated to Safranbolu Municipality by Müezzinoglu Family (Nuri - Meliha Isitan) in 1975. Ownership of the mosque passed from the Municipality to General Directorate of Foundation in 2004 and its restoration was accomplished in the same year.   http://www.waymarking.com/

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I like this photo, and hope these historic building will always be protected.

But from my experiences Turkey is really very much more modern than this photo would imply. 

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Ruth and Randal




Boston Red Sox hat travels the world.